Relative Something

*this* John W. Hays’ take on things and experiences

Fighting Wind

with 8 comments

Of all the days to try to put on the roof panels, the strong gusting winds we experienced yesterday made it much more challenging than desired. I didn’t help myself any by having previously installed the middle row of plastic panel supports just a little out of line.

Regardless, I am claiming victory and celebrating the completion of the roof. Hurrah!

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George stopped by to inspect our progress and Cyndie snapped a photo while I gave him a tour of the place.

With rain predicted, we decided to try wrapping a tarp around 3 of the walls for the night. Even though I am getting weary of the daily intensity of this project, we’ve reached a point where I pretty much need to forge ahead and get the coop buttoned up and weather-tight.

The bungie-tied partial tarp is not going to cut it for long.

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Written by johnwhays

October 11, 2016 at 6:00 am

8 Responses

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  1. Reading along here, I can witness that you still love and thrive on challenges, John: great to tune into, savor and relish all over again.

    Ian Rowcliffe

    October 11, 2016 at 7:52 am

    • Nice to see your words again, Ian! How are your chickens getting along at the Forest Garden Estate?

      johnwhays

      October 11, 2016 at 7:55 am

      • Oh, they are as hard-working as ever, mini-tractors spreading the manure – quite a full time job.-)

        Ian Rowcliffe

        October 11, 2016 at 2:51 pm

      • I’m really looking forward to having our own, for that very reason.

        johnwhays

        October 11, 2016 at 10:02 pm

      • It would be special to assign them as gardeners of your labarinth: you’d just need to deposit the manure near the bushes and they’d take it from there. Look what can be done with ducks: http://vergenoegd.co.za/meet-our-runner-ducks/
        Chickens sift, till and weed the earth, so the plants get the nutrients. Not indicated for smaller plants, though. And they pay you for doing it by providing delicious eggs.

        Ian Rowcliffe

        October 12, 2016 at 4:39 am

      • That is a large number of ducks! We will start small with our flock of chickens, but hope to eventually give them free range access to our pastures as well as the labyrinth garden, where we have a ready store of manure that Cyndie uses around the plants.
        The biggest challenge there will be training Delilah to accept them as friends, not food.

        johnwhays

        October 12, 2016 at 8:36 am

      • Yes, Delilah: you need to get her to understand that they are part of HER flock. Once she gets that she will help to defend them, which in your part of the world is probably of great significance. Don’t give her the chance to make mistakes, ease her into it, praising her every step of the way. In the end, she will love being their watch dog and will take great joy in the process.

        Ian Rowcliffe

        October 12, 2016 at 9:22 am

      • Oh, yes! That is exactly what we wish for. I will focus on that vision as we work to guide her toward it.
        Thank you!

        johnwhays

        October 12, 2016 at 9:29 am


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